For the Glory of God Alone

April 8, 2010

 

 A few weeks ago I started a series on the Mass. This is part two on the Introductory Rites. If you want to catch up click here.

When we left off we’d just finished the penitential rite. After the penitential rite we sing the Gloria.

The relationship between the penitential prayer and the Gloria is beautiful. In the penitential rite we’ve confessed our sin and our need for God’s forgiveness. Now with faith in the grace and mercy of God we sing the Gloria with joy and give Him glory because we know we are forgiven!

By the way, like many parts of the Mass, the Gloria is taken from Scripture. The opening line comes from the second chapter of the Gospel of Luke. [And you thought we Catholics didn’t know the Bible or use it in our worship. Just wait until we get to the Liturgy of the Word.]

Here’s the Gloria in its entirety…

Glory to God in the highest and peace to His people on earth.
Lord God, Heavenly King, Almighty God and Father.
We worship you, we give you thanks, we praise you for your glory.
Lord Jesus Christ, only Son of the Father.
Lord God, Lamb of God, you take away the sin of the world:
have mercy on us;
You are seated at the right hand of the Father: receive our prayer.
For you alone are the Holy One, you alone are the Lord.
You alone are the most high, Jesus Christ, with the Holy Spirit,
in the glory of God the Father.
Amen.

If you come to Mass during Advent and Lent you won’t hear the Gloria. These are seasons of penance during which we don’t sing the Gloria, not until Christmas Eve and the Easter Vigil.  When we finally sing the Gloria it’s sung loudly with bells ringing throughout the entire song in celebration of God’s grace, mercy and forgiveness.

While on the topic of muisc…

One thing that was different for me when I left my non-denominational church and started attending Mass was the way I experienced the use of  music for worship. Not only was the style different (until I discovered the Life Teen Mass which incorporates more contemporary music) but so was the placement of music in the service.

In most of the Protestant churches I attended the music was sung at the beginning of the service. We called this our time of  “praise and worship.”  Instead of having us sing worship songs for 15 minutes and then sit down to listen to a man speak for an hour, the Mass engages us in worship the entire time (minus a short homily). Music is incorporated throughout the service as we participate in the different prayers and parts of the liturgy.

Because worship music had always been a big part of  my life it took me a while to get used to this difference but I’ve grown to appreciate and even prefer the way music is used in the Mass.

Music is never the focal point in the Mass which helps to keep it from becoming about the glory of man. You’ll never see a worship band at “center stage” during a Mass. The Eucharist, Jesus, who is the Word made flesh, is the focal point of the Mass. Neither is the use of music designed to entertain and entice people to come to Mass. The music is simply part of the ongoing prayer of the Mass.

 Once we’ve finished singing the Gloria we remain standing for the Opening Prayer.  Before this prayer, the celebrant raises his arms. This isn’t a random act on his part, even this gesture has meaning. It’s linked to the Gloria and the penitential rite.

The priest, standing there with his arms raised, is symbolic of the person who’s been freed from sin through the Resurrection of Jesus. This, of course, is what we’ve just professed and experienced through the penitential rite and the singing of the Gloria. Jesus ascended to heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father. Because of the resurrection power we are set free from death and the power of sin. Glory to God in the highest!

The opening prayer is not something the priest makes up based on how he’s feeling that day. It’s related to the liturgical season or the feast day celebrated during this Mass and it’s prayed at every Mass in every Catholic Church on that day. The tradition of this prayer, which is also known as the collect, has been around since the 5th century.

Just from the Introductory Rites you can see begin to see that everything done in the Mass has a purpose. It’s rich in tradition, symbolism and based on Scripture. And, it’s done for the glory of God alone (Soli Deo Gloria).

When you understand the symbolism and how everything has meaning (even the simple gesture of a priest raising his arms in prayer) you realize that the Mass is far from being  “old dead liturgy” as my friend described it. No, the Mass is alive and well and we’ve only just covered the Introductory Rites!

Next up, the Liturgy of the Word.